RFID: A Swiss Army Knife for Visionary Companies

Every now and then, our customers require a little more than software code to fully realise their creative objectives. In these cases, while we do not claim to be hardware manufacturers, Software Planet Group are always prepared to work with our partners in the United Kingdom and Europe to seamlessly bridge the gap between hard- and software systems. Luckily for inventive companies today, as the world has slowly turned towards a web of interconnected devices, this has become more simple and affordable than ever. And in that regard, perhaps no technology is better placed to assist than Radio Frequency Identification (RFID).

RFID is by no means new. The technology traces its earliest origins to the 1940s’ Soviet Union, where a similar tool was used as an espionage device, and has existed in its modern form since at least 1973. It has only recently, however, begun to fulfil the vision of its creator, American Inventor Mario Cardullo. In a prophetic 1969 speech to investors, Cardullo presented his gadget as a powerful swiss army knife that could one day be used to create electronic credit cards, enhance security through automatic gates, automate toll road systems, and even assist medical personnel with patient identification. Yet in spite of these hugely accurate predictions on modern-day society, most people have failed to notice the use of Cardullo’s device beyond anti-theft gates in department stores. In reality, however, RFID is ubiquitous.

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Programming Technologies: The True Cost of a Wrong Choice

Just as in the fashion industry, the development world is prone to occasionally give in to fleeting trends. New and exciting programming languages often take companies by storm, spawning in the whirlwind a flurry of articles that aim to justify the latest fad. To be fair, some of these trends have indeed stuck around to prove themselves worthy of their initial hype. Others, however, simply left their soiled footprints all over the internet and to this day mislead customers who believe them to be a worthwhile investment.

As a result of this post-truth era, it is not uncommon for companies to ask us to develop web solutions using less-than-ideal programming languages. The reality, however, is that every project is unique and should be treated as such. For this blog post, Software Planet Group would like to highlight recent trends to explain why some technologies may best be left ignored for the moment.

Ruby on Rails

Touted as a very simple way to engineer a minimum viable product, Ruby on Rails found its niche in the startup movement and quickly surged in popularity. At its peak in 2007, demand for the web application framework was so high that 60 percent of all our software developers were somehow involved in RoR projects. Today, however, the Ruby wave has unmistakably turned to foam, leaving in its wake a dwindling number of developers who are qualified to maintain these systems.

Compared to more modern alternatives, RoR has fallen noticeably behind

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The Internet of Things: Where Hardware and Software Unite

Who can forget the joyously nostalgic opening scene from The Lego Movie? In addition to getting the hit song “Everything is Awesome” stuck in our heads for days, the film unrelentingly reminded us of all the reasons we played with Lego sets as children, as the versatile bricks could be combined in infinite ways to create anything we conceived. As a matter of fact, since their initial release in 1949, Lego bricks have been used to create unexpected projects ranging from life-sized cars and houses to a complete rendering of the Mona Lisa.

While our more youthful days may be long behind us, recent innovations in the tech world are resurrecting this kind of childhood play among developers. Thanks to projects like Arduino Uno and Raspberry Pi, software engineers are able to create imaginative hardware that rival even the most inventive of Lego designs — a distinct turning point in the increasingly prevalent Internet of Things.

To most people, the term ‘Internet of Things’ (IoT) still registers as foreign lexicon, so a quick explanation is warranted. Simply put, IoT refers to the concept of connecting all our devices to the internet and each other. This can include everything from our mobile phones and smart watches to cars and washing machines, and is perhaps most recognised today in our smart lights and heating systems. As the trend shows no sign of waning, developing hardware for the IoT has become easily accessible to anyone.

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Does Your Company Need Microservices?

We often encounter customers who believe their problems are entirely unique to their organisations, but this is rarely the case. In reality, Software Planet Group are always tackling recurring problems in development. This is why we employ so-called architectural patterns as reusable solutions to many of these issues. One pattern in particular has recently earned the spotlight among programmers for its forward-looking approach to software design. While applications have traditionally been built as a monolith, that is, software constructed as a single unit, using the architectural pattern known as microservices, developers are able to design and maintain applications through wholly independent components.

The independent nature of microservices also allows programmers to develop, upgrade and replace components in complete isolation from one another. From a technical standpoint, this provides much higher scalability, which means the system is capable of coping and performing well under an increasingly expanding workload. In addition, because each service is responsible for its own data, the solution allows information to be managed in a decentralised fashion. As a result, services are free to use the datastores that make sense to them.

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So What’s Big Data Really Worth?

Over the years, the world has generated extraordinary amounts of information that can boggle even the most collected of minds. Twitter alone registered a record 500 million tweets per day in 2015, and now Amazon, the greatest provider of cloud services, is reportedly adding computing power on a daily basis that is equal to their entire capacity just a decade ago. While most companies are unlikely to produce anywhere near as much data, like sleeping dragons on piles of gold, they often go about their businesses completely unaware of the untapped potential of their files. By contrast, companies shrewd enough to tackle big data are already reaping enormous benefits.

Big data solutions enable corporations to unleash the power of their records by uncovering hidden patterns and correlations, revealing customer preferences and finding long forgotten valuable information. This is the same technology that allows Google to remind you of your trip to Majorca, and facebook to create ads tailored especially to you. The applications of big data solutions, however, extend far beyond the internet. Big data analytics is also used to predict the outcomes of elections and sporting events, warn health professionals of potential epidemic outbreaks and even improve the flow of traffic for entire communities.

 

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The Blockchain: How Decentralised Software Changes Everything

Until very recently, all internet data was stored on web servers. There were many reasons for this, but one in particular was hugely important: by keeping information in scattered points across the globe, servers prevented the unauthorised altering of data. This is why you are able to trust that your facebook account will not be accessed by anyone other than you. Or, stated another way, facebook has become a trusted intermediary between you and the content you access online. With the advent of cryptocurrency Bitcoin, however, the stage was set for a profound technological change.

Bitcoin’s notorious reputation in the media is largely due to the threat it poses to the current financial order. By allowing peers to transfer money without the intervention of banks or government agencies, Bitcoin introduced a vast paradigm shift. Where news outlets have truly failed the public, however, has been in their reluctance to report on the groundbreaking technology behind the digital currency  the blockchain. As a matter of fact, Bitcoin is to the blockchain what facebook is to the internet, and the world is only just beginning to tap into the potential applications for this new technology. Software Planet Group would like our customers to know about the opportunities that lie ahead for companies choosing to embrace decentralised software.

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What Enterprise Search Can Do for Your Company

As a company grows, it becomes nearly impossible to avoid the problems caused by accumulating vast amounts of data. Through the years, these are often filed away in independent, incompatible software systems that are never merged together, making the retrieval of important information at best cumbersome and at worst unsustainable. More worryingly, perhaps, many companies today are completely unaware of the existence of valuable records within their own organisations, as standard search tools rely much too heavily on keywords to return meaningful results.

Failing to take action, however, can cost companies dearly. In addition to creating chaos and underperformance, poorly managed data could also lead to making harmful business decisions.

To confront this information overload, Enterprise Search (ES) has evolved as an easy and secure way to access and search through content from multiple sources such as company databases, document storage units and other ordinarily incompatible systems. Through its simple API, Enterprise Search is able to join all data sources into a single, searchable interface, putting companies back on track. When savvily implemented, it enables users to filter information by specific criteria such as dates, names, values and more, lowering costs, improving productivity and increasing revenues as a result.

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