Posts Tagged Under: Security

A Warning on Crypto Exchange Projects

Although interest in crypto investing has lately seen a gradual decline, with the recent explosion in the value of Bitcoin, we are often approached by prize-eyeing customers who are eager to begin their own crypto exchange.

Unfortunately, however, this is very much akin to taking a rudderless rowing boat out into the open ocean — without an adequate plan, you are likely to be rocked by unexpected tidal waves.

For this reason, Software Planet would now like to divulge some critical information for those who are still determined to embark upon this journey.

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Information Security: Keeping up with the Trends and Challenges

To be the ultimate software provider, you have to be willing to meet all aspects of your customers’ needs. This is why in addition to developing software, SPG offer vital security audits of both IT infrastructure and software, arm businesses with an effective action plan and help companies to resolve any newfound underlying issues. Get in touch if your company requires assessment, development or testing services!

Oh, and by the way: we’re attending two major cybersecurity events in London — Infosecurity Europe, from the 4th-6th of June, and IFSEC, between June 18th-20th — and would be more than willing to meet you there and discuss your security requirements.

In the meantime, however, please enjoy the article below about the various steps that Software Planet Group are already taking today to keep all of our developers on top of the latest tech trends:

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Meltdown and Spectre: How Everyone Is Affected

Although it may have been dubbed the “worst bug ever,” for many years, the mechanism behind security vulnerabilities Meltdown and Spectre was widely regarded as a cornerstone of modern processor design.

It was only at the turn of the year that talk of a serious threat to cybersecurity began making the online rounds. Without any substantial evidence, the subject was cautiously treated as a rumour, but after days of intensifying speculation, Intel were forced to finally come clean.

And so, in an astounding January 3 statement, the chip giant finally admitted that critical security flaws are indeed present in most modern-day processors, including ARM and AMD. Essentially, this conceded that no one is immune to the danger, as it affects virtually all personal computers, cloud servers, and mobile phones as well.

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The GDPR: Are You Ready for It?

We’ve all done it.

At last, after prowling through the depths of the internet for what seems like an eternity, we stumble upon the perfect web solution — and sign up for it without a second thought.

Of course, what then happens to our data is in the hands of the tech gods, as yet again, like countless others before us, we have agreed to terms and conditions we never once read.

Thankfully, the imminent EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) ensures that this will soon become a thing of the past.

But with new rules set to take full effect by mid 2018, millions of companies worldwide must now face up to their unpreparedness and see it for what it truly is: a critical liability.

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Plan & Prevent: The Secret to Overcoming a Ransomware Attack

Last May, we watched in bewilderment as our already crippled NHS was dealt yet another blow — an unprecedented cyber attack was causing chaos and disruption in one in five NHS trusts across England, and we had barely heard the half of it. As the story continued to unfold, newscasters relayed that the attack had been a global phenomenon, quickly spreading to 150 countries and infecting over 230,000 computers.

The guilty party was a malicious program known as WannaCry, ransomware designed specifically to exploit an old Windows vulnerability in order to lock systems, encrypt files and demand $300 (£232) in exchange for a decryption key. While many were warned not to pay the ransom, as there was no guarantee of ever recovering one’s data, the cybercrooks reportedly earned £55,000 in more than 260 Bitcoin transactions.

With such alarming figures, it is not difficult to see why so many hackers have turned to ransomware as a convenient and lucrative form of criminal behaviour. Ironically, however, standard security procedures are also responsible for the increasing danger. Because IT specialists keep open databases listing all known recent threats, cybercriminals are able to use this information to target system weaknesses. To make matters worse, most companies fail to install security patches as soon as they become available, leaving the door wide open for further attacks.

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